From the Field

Connecting YOU with Wildlife – Pennsylvania Game Commission


No. 5 – Are There Regulations Within DMAs?

Through the end of deer season, we will be posting a frequently asked question (FAQ) and answer related to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Pennsylvania in an album on our Facebook page.

We know many of you – hunters, non-hunters, processors, taxidermists and more – have questions about CWD and the effects this disease can cause. We are here as a resource and want to help everyone understand the complexities and details related to CWD in our state.

If you have a specific question related to CWD, email pgccomments@pa.gov.

Here’s the question for week five:

CWD Fact 5.jpg

Answer:

Within Disease Management Areas, specific regulations and rules apply to reduce the risk of spreading CWD. Within DMAs it is unlawful to export high-risk parts, use or possess urine-based attractants in the field, and feed wild deer (which includes the use of mineral licks). High-risk parts include the brain, eyes, tonsils, lymph nodes, spinal cord, and spleen. Once high-risk parts are removed, the processed meat on or off the bone, capes and antlers attached to the skull plate with no visible brain matter may be transported throughout Pennsylvania.

Click here for more information about CWD.

As a reminder, if you have a specific question related to CWD email it to pgccomments@pa.gov.

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Video: How to Find CWD Information Online

Having a hard time finding specific information about Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in Pennsylvania? The Game Commission’s CWD Communications Specialist Courtney Colley provides a step-by-step visual guide on how to find some of the most sought information online. Click the video above, or here, to view the video guide.

www.pgc.pa.gov

Courtney starts this video by walking viewers through resources available on the Pennsylvania Game Commission’s website, including how to find a copy of the most recent executive order about CWD in Pennsylvania, which describes Disease Management Areas (DMAs) and lists other CWD positive states. There’s a link to Title 58, which provides regulations currently in place in Pennsylvania related to CWD. There’s also a public event schedule on the Game Commission’s website of related events. A link to a 30-minute webinar on CWD is there, too. Another great resource is our interactive map – helpful for hunters who will be hunting in a DMA. We also have a comprehensive FAQ list on our CWD page.

www.padls.org

The next helpful site Courtney outlines on the program is the Pennsylvania Animal Diagnostic Laboratory System, which is a subsection of the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, which conducts CWD testing in Pennsylvania. Courtney mentions a CWD FAQ list on this site, which can also be helpful for hunters, including information on getting a deer tested for CWD.

www.cwd-info.org

The final site Courtney highlights is the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance’s page, which is a great resource for hunters who intend to hunt out-of-state. This alliance is a collaborative project between the Boone and Crockett Club, the Mule Deer Foundation, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and more, with the intentions of providing scientifically accurate information to the public related to CWD. The alliance’s recent news section is a great way to keep up-to-date with the new CWD cases in North America, as well as regulations in other states. There’s a helpful U.S. map at the bottom of the homepage for hunters who hunt out-of-state. You can easily find other CWD-positive states and regulations.

Still not finding what you’re looking for?

Courtney has a few other site resource suggestions:


No. 4 – What Precautions Should Processors and Taxidermists Take?

Through the end of deer season, we will be posting a frequently asked question (FAQ) and answer related to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Pennsylvania in an album on our Facebook page.

We know many of you – hunters, non-hunters, processors, taxidermists and more – have questions about CWD and the effects this disease can cause. We are here as a resource and want to help everyone understand the complexities and details related to CWD in our state.

If you have a specific question related to CWD, email pgccomments@pa.gov.

Here’s the question for week four:

CWD Fact 4

Answer:

To date, CWD has not been found to infect humans. However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends humans reduce their exposure to CWD-infected animals.

It is recommended that processors and taxidermists take steps to help reduce their exposure to CWD-infected meat or parts. Individuals should wear latex or nitrile gloves when processing deer meat.

To decrease exposure to high-risk parts, which include the brain, eyes, tonsils, lymph nodes, spinal cord, and spleen, de-bone the meat.

Avoid cutting through the spinal cord, if possible. After handling deer meat, individuals should wash hands and tools thoroughly with soap and water, then sanitize tools using a 50/50 bleach solution.

It is important to note that it is currently unlawful to export high-risk parts from a DMA or import high-risk parts from a CWD-positive state. This helps reduce the spread of this disease.

Click here for more information pertaining to processors and taxidermists.

As a reminder, if you have a specific question related to CWD email it to pgccomments@pa.gov.


Bowhunting the Rut in Pennsylvania

Mature Buck by Jacob Dingel 08595

Mature buck. Photo by Jacob Dingel.

The steady crunching of leaves signals the approach of a large animal in the woods. Your hand tightens on the bow grip and your eyes scan the colorful forest for a hint of brown antler. With the whitetail rut about to begin, anything can happen. For bowhunters across Pennsylvania and the rest of the nation, this is a magical time to be deer hunting.

The last week of October and the first two weeks of November are when the largest number of bucks are taken with archery gear in the Keystone State.  These are simply some of the best days that you can spend in a tree stand or ground blind hunting. With the mature bucks becoming more active and making their presence known during the daylight hours, this period of time is unique in the whitetail world.

In late October, when the pre-rut is starting to wrap up and the full rut is beginning to kick off is sort of a transitional period, and if you understand this transition you can certainly use it to your advantage and put a nice whitetail on the ground with your arrow.

Buck at Licking Branch by Jacob Dingel 13901

Buck at licking branch. Photo by Jacob Dingel.

Rut Basics

When it comes to whitetail hunting, most hunters understand that there are three primary phases to the rut. There are the pre-rut, the rut, and the post-rut. Many hunters will debate that there are actually additional spikes of heavy breeding activity after the rut has concluded where mature bucks will actively seek and locate the last of the in-bred does, does that were late into heat or fawns that are available to breed late in the season. As you can imagine, just like there are spikes in rut activity after the “official rut” has concluded, there are also spikes in activity as the rut is beginning to kick off.

The world of the whitetail knows no calendar. Whitetail bucks don’t wake up one day and say “Well, tomorrow the rut is going to start so I had better get a good night’s rest.”  Instead, it is the shorter days and the cooler weather that help to initiate the start of the rut, and it doesn’t just happen overnight. There is a steady buildup of rutting activity that is in the shape of a bell curve and we are currently trending upward in terms of activity.

From now until mid- to late-November, mature whitetail bucks will become more diurnal, meaning they will be out more during the daylight hours. Our first bow season segment statewide concludes on Nov. 12, so this timing allows bow hunters to experience much of the best rutting activity. Right now, mature whitetail bucks are beginning to reaffirm their territory. They are beginning to compete more with other aggressive bucks, they are beginning to freshen up scrapes and rub lines and perhaps most importantly, they are beginning to cruise in search of the first receptive doe of the season. When you add all of these factors together, there is certainly an opportunity to take advantage of a mature whitetail’s eager nature and bring him into bow range.

Does And Food

During the rut, sometimes finding the mature bucks means finding the does first. In other words, if you have the does in your hunting area then you have a good chance of seeing some bucks during the rut. Right now, as we transition from the pre-rut to the rut most of the state is experiencing its first hard frosts of the fall. As the acorn drop has begun to slow by this time, the colder temperatures can have the deer beginning the transition back from masts such as acorns to annual grain crops like corn and soybeans.

This time of year can be one of the best opportunities for a whitetail hunter to experience a surprise daylight encounter with a mature whitetail buck. As the does begin to transition back to various forages or begin to use different areas of the property, it can be very important to stick with them. Don’t be afraid to make a move and establish new stand locations based upon doe activity. Over the next week or so, mature bucks will begin to check these areas more and more in search of the first does to come into estrus, and these areas can be fantastic locations to intercept a buck. Mature bucks can be harder to hunt once they have found a doe in heat, so stacking the odds in your favor can be critical to your success during this critical period of the season. Keying in on does and food can help you accomplish this task.

Scraping Buck by Jacob Dingel 07362

Scraping buck. Photo by Jacob Dingel.

Vocalizations

Right now, as the pre-rut begins to give way to the rut, using calling and vocalizations can really start to play a big role in your hunting strategy. If you have never tried grunting in a buck, you really should give it a try.

Right now, mature whitetail bucks are really just beginning to be more vocal, which tends to happen as they begin checking and chasing the first does of the fall. Even if the doe is not in estrus, bucks will often grunt, growl and snort wheeze as they check and court would-be does and bump other bucks off.

As the pre-rut ends and rut begins, it is an excellent time to begin ramping up your deer vocalization efforts. A buck can very easily have his interest perked by the sounds of grunting and rattling, just to satisfy his curiosity about what other bucks may be doing.  As the transitional period moves into the full rut phase, you can begin to become more aggressive with your calling and rattling.

Much of what we know about the whitetail rut comes from scientific studies, and Pennsylvania is blessed to have one of the best deer research teams in the world. Penn State University’s biologists have decades of in-depth studies that are of great interest and importance to deer hunters.

For a fascinating story on buck movement during the rut, visit Penn State’s Deer Forest Blog to view a feature on studies with radio-collared deer.

Stay tuned for the next blog about specific hunting tactics to use during the first week of November.

Happy hunting!


No. 3. – How Do I Get My Deer Tested?

Through the end of deer season, we will be posting a frequently asked question (FAQ) and answer related to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Pennsylvania in an album on our Facebook page.

We know many of you – hunters, non-hunters, processors, taxidermists and more – have questions about CWD and the effects this disease can cause. We are here as a resource and want to help everyone understand the complexities and details related to CWD in our state.

If you have a specific question related to CWD, email pgccomments@pa.gov.

Here’s the question for week three:

CWD Fact 3.jpg

Answer:

To increase surveillance efforts, hunters who are harvesting deer within Disease Management Areas (DMAs), can get them tested for free by depositing the head from their in a head-collection container provided by the Game Commission.

When depositing a head, be sure that the harvest tag is completed and attached to the ear. Heads should be double-bagged and closed prior to depositing. Locations of head-collection containers can be found on the interactive map located on the Pennsylvania Game Commission website.

On average, results take four to six weeks. Hunters harvesting deer outside a DMA, can get them tested for a fee at the Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory in Harrisburg. Please note, this test is not a food safety test.

Click here for more information about CWD.

As a reminder, if you have a specific question related to CWD email it to pgccomments@pa.gov.


No. 2 – What is a Disease Management Area?

Through the end of deer season, we will be posting a frequently asked question (FAQ) and answer related to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Pennsylvania in an album on our Facebook page.

We know many of you – hunters, non-hunters, processors, taxidermists and more – have questions about CWD and the effects this disease can cause. We are here as a resource and want to help everyone understand the complexities and details related to CWD in our state.

If you have a specific question related to CWD, email pgccomments@pa.gov.

Here’s the question for week two:

CWD Fact 2

Answer:

Pennsylvania’s Disease Management Areas, or “DMAs,” have been established because at least one CWD-positive animal has been detected in close proximity. Within DMAs, specific regulations and rules apply to reduce the risk of further spreading CWD.

DMAs are established by creating a 10-mile radius buffer around the new CWD positive. In areas where CWD is present and a new CWD-positive animal is detected, no changes are made to the DMA boundary if the 10-mile buffer associated with that animal falls well within the existing DMA.

However, if the new CWD-positive location falls outside or near the existing DMA boundary, an existing DMA might be expanded or a new one created. Currently, Pennsylvania has three active DMAs.

To learn the location of DMAs within the state, please refer to our interactive map.

Click here for more information about CWD.

As a reminder, if you have a specific question related to CWD email it to pgccomments@pa.gov.

You can learn more about DMAs in Pennsylvania here.


No. 1 – What is Chronic Wasting Disease?

Through the end of deer season, we will be posting a frequently asked question (FAQ) and answer related to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Pennsylvania in an album on our Facebook page.

We know many of you – hunters, non-hunters, processors, taxidermists and more – have questions about CWD and the effects this disease can cause. We are here as a resource and want to help everyone understand the complexities and details related to CWD in our state.

If you have a specific question related to CWD, email pgccomments@pa.gov.

Here’s the question for week one:

CWD Fact 1

Answer:

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an always-fatal neurodegenerative disease of cervids including deer and elk. CWD is a type of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy disease, other TSE diseases include mad cow disease, scrapie, and Cruetzfeldt-Jakob disease.

The causative agent of TSE diseases is an abnormally folded protein or prion. As these prions accumulate in the brain, they begin to cause tissue damage, eventually leading to holes in the brain.

CWD can be transmitted directly (through animal-to-animal contact) or indirectly (through a contaminated environment). CWD prions can be shed through bodily fluids such as saliva, urine, and feces. CWD was first detected in 1967 in a captive deer facility in Colorado. Since then, CWD has spread to 25 states and three Canadian provinces, including Pennsylvania.

Click here for more information.

As a reminder, if you have a specific question related to CWD email it to pgccomments@pa.gov.