From the Field

Connecting YOU with Wildlife – Pennsylvania Game Commission


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Pennsylvania Fluorescent Orange Requirement Charts

Jack-o’-lanterns, pumpkin pie, falling leaves and candy corn all display the color that we associate with autumn—orange! Many hunters also add orange to their fall attire. This fluorescent orange helps hunters to be seen and to see others who are wearing it while afield.  Fluorescent orange requirements vary by game season. The visual charts below come in handy when figuring out which fluorescent orange attire is required.

Click on the images to enlarge.

Orange1

Orange2

If you have questions about orange requirements, check the Hunting and Trapping Digest, , e-mail pgccomments@pa.gov, or call your region office.

Region office contact information can be found here: http://tiny.cc/ROffice


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Benefits of Bats

As Halloween approaches, images of bats becomes more prevalent. Bats have a bad reputation for carrying diseases and getting tangled in hair. However, these tiny flying mammals provide great benefits to humans.

BENEFITS OF BATS

Bats are the only major predators of night flying insects.

  • Bats play an important role in controlling many insect pests.
  • A single bat can consume as many as 500 insects in just one hour, or nearly 3,000 insects every night.
  • A colony of 100 little brown bats, may consume more than a quarter of a million mosquitos and other insects per night.

Healthy bat populations decrease the demand for chemical pesticides.

  • Bats benefit farmers by eating agricultural pests such as June bugs, stinkbugs, leafhoppers, and corn rootworms.

Bats are great pollinators.

  • Bats helps to pollinate flowers and disperse seeds for countless trees and shrubs.

Bats help to maintain forest health.

  • Some bats feed on forest pests such as tent caterpillar moths.

Bat droppings in caves support ecosystems of unique organisms

  • Cave bat droppings support bacteria that is used in detoxifying wastes, improving detergents and producing antibiotics.

HOW CAN I SUPPORT BATS?

Once people learn the beneficial role that bats play in controlling insects, they often want to attract bats to their yards and garden.

Bat boxes provide shelter opportunities for bats. Plans for bat boxes can be found on the Game Commission website. A bat box may remain vacant because of other roosts in the area. However if roosts are scarce, bats may move in quickly.

-Excerpts from:

A Homeowner’s Guide to Northeastern Bats and Bat Problems, Penn State Extension

and Year of the Bat 2011-12, Bat Facts, Bat Conservation International


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LEGISLATION TO ALLOW CONSERVATION OFFICERS TO USE BODY CAMERAS HAS CLEARED THE HOUSE

law enforcement
Urging State Senate to Increase Officer Safety

Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director R. Matthew Hough today urged the state Senate to act quickly to pass legislation that would allow Wildlife Conservation Officers working for the Game Commission and Waterways Conservation Officers working for the state Fish and Boat Commission to wear body cameras in performance of their official duties.

The state House of Representatives overwhelmingly has supported House Bill 2178, which was sponsored by state Rep. Dan Moul, R-Adams County. The bill passed the House in June by a vote of 191-5. Hough urged the Senate to follow suit.

Mobile Video-Recording Devices Would Be Helpful During Fall Hunting Seasons

“As most Pennsylvanians know, the fall hunting seasons are almost here, and our officers already have begun ramping up patrols to stop poaching activity and other illegal practices,” Hough said. “Mobile video-recording devices have been shown to make the jobs of law-enforcement officers safer, and a timely vote by Senators to allow our Wildlife Conservation Officers to wear the cameras now, as they enter their busiest time of year, would have an immediate impact with measurable results. “I thank Senators in advance for making officer safety a high priority,” Hough said.

The use of body cameras already has been expressly approved by the state Legislature for other police agencies statewide. The devices, which can be clipped onto an officer’s uniform, are similar to the dashboard cameras installed in most law-enforcement vehicles. The mobile cameras are considered especially suitable for Wildlife Conservation Officers, who often patrol while on foot.

Cameras Help to Defuse Hostile Situations

The mere presence of cameras can quickly defuse what might otherwise become hostile situations, and cameras often capture valuable evidence that increases the chances of successful prosecutions.

Cameras Support Transparency

A report from the Department of Justice concluded that when implemented correctly, body-worn cameras can help strengthen the policing profession. These cameras can help promote agency accountability and transparency, and they can be useful tools for increasing officer professionalism, improving officer training, preserving evidence, and documenting encounters with the public.

Cameras Already Purchased

The Game Commission in 2012 purchased body cameras for its officers, and officers used them briefly in the field before the law was changed to provide that only state and municipal police officers could use body cameras. Moul, whose legislative district includes the area of Adams County where Wildlife Conservation Officer David L. Grove was shot and killed by a poacher in 2010, sponsored the legislation as a way to increase officer safety. The Senate could vote on the bill as early as this week.


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MANHUNT PLACES HUNTING SEASONS ON HOLD IN SEVEN TOWNSHIPS IN WMU 3D

The Pennsylvania Game Commission has temporarily closed all hunting and trapping seasons within seven townships in northeastern Pennsylvania, where the search continues for a fugitive wanted in the shooting death of a state police trooper.

What townships are affected?

Game Commission Executive Director R. Matthew Hough issued an executive order to close temporarily the hunting and trapping seasons within Price, Barrett and Paradise townships in Monroe County; and Blooming Grove, Porter, Lehman and Greene townships in Pike County.The townships all are within Wildlife Management Unit 3D.Hunting Closure

What lands does this affect?

The closure affects all private and public lands, including the portions of State Game Lands 180, 183 and 221 located within those townships. Those portions of game lands are closed to all public access while the executive order is in effect.

How long will those areas be closed?

Hunting and trapping seasons will remain closed in the identified townships until the executive order is lifted, which will be announced by the Game Commission in a statewide news release that will be posted on the agency’s website at the time it is issued.

Why are these areas closed?

The closure was initiated after the Pennsylvania State Police advised on Tuesday that troopers who are part of the search for fugitive Eric Frein had uncovered explosive devices that apparently were left behind in wooded areas by the fugitive, and would pose an obvious danger to anyone who would encounter them.

Hough said the discovery of the devices, and the danger associated with the search effort in general, would pose too great a risk to hunters, trappers and members of the general public.

“While we realize this temporary closure might disappoint some of the hunters and trappers it affects, we’re certain, too, they understand the gravity of the situation, as well as the danger in allowing the seasons to continue as scheduled, given this new information,” Hough said. “Plenty of good hunting and trapping opportunities remain outside of the temporarily closed area, and we need hunters to readily adjust their plans to help bring resolution to this case and see that justice is served.”

Frein is wanted in the Sept. 12 ambush-shooting death of Pennsylvania State Police Cpl. Bryon Dickson II outside the state police barracks in Blooming Grove, Pike County. Trooper Alex Douglass was wounded in the attack. The search for Frein has continued since, and police recently discovered explosive devices – at least one of which was attached to a trip wire – in the area they were searching.

What authorizes the Game Commission to close hunting seasons?

The Pennsylvania Game and Wildlife Code authorizes the Game Commission to close any hunting or trapping season, or otherwise take necessary action, to assure the purposes of the code, including assuring the health and safety of the persons who hunt or take game and wildlife.

The Game Commission earlier this week issued an advisory to those who might be planning to hunt in the area of the search, and indicated that the seasons would continue as scheduled, but the recent findings by state police changed the circumstances.

Safety is paramount
Game Commissioner James J. Delaney Jr. , who represents Pike, Monroe and other northeastern Pennsylvania counties as part of the eight-member board that sets policy for the Game Commission, said the temporary closure is supported in full by the commissioners and is necessary given the totality of circumstances.

By closing the hunting seasons in the area of the search, the Game Commission hopes to remove any risk to human safety, and ensure there will be no interference in the effort to apprehend Frein.

“The suspect has demonstrated a disregard for human life,” Delaney said, “The safety of the law-enforcement officers who are part of the search, as well as that of the sporting public, must take precedence here.”

Message to sportsmen and women

Approximately 80% of WMU 3D is not closed to hunting. Some of the areas that remain open to hunting in WMU 3D include public state game land.

It is too soon to speculate on what action the Commission could take if the Executive Order remains in effect for an extended period of time. Right now our primary focus is on the safety and well being of our hunting license buyers and on assisting the state police in their search for Eric Frein. We thank you for understanding and for your patience.


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Fall Programs and Events

The Game Commission is hosting several fall programs in Elk County and one at the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area. View the schedule below.

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September 27 Visit with the Game Commission, Elk County Visit with the Game Commission on the elk range at Winslow Hill and Dents Run. 3:30 PM until dark. Enhance your visit with a list of elk viewing destinations and information about Pennsylvania elk.  The Winslow Hill Viewing Area is located on top of Winslow Hill 1.2 miles north of route 555 on the left side of Winslow Hill Road from Benezette. The Dents Run Viewing Area is located along Winslow Hill Road, roughly two miles north of route 555 from Benezette. Continue past the Winslow Hill viewing area about eight-tenths of a mile on the black-topped Winslow Hill Road. More information is available through the Northcentral Region Office, 570-398-4744.

September 27 Campfire and Geocaching Program, Elk County Visit with the Game Commission on the elk range at Dents Run for a campfire (starts at 7:30 PM) and a program on Geocaching(8-8:30 PM) followed by an optional Night Cache. Bring your own chair and flashlight. Enhance your visit with a list of elk viewing destinations and information about Pennsylvania elk. The Dents Run Viewing Area is located along Winslow Hill Road, roughly two miles north of route 555 from Benezette. Continue past the Winslow Hill viewing area about eight-tenths of a mile on the black-topped Winslow Hill Road. More information is available through the Northcentral Region Office, 570-398-4744.
September 28 National Hunting & Fishing Day, Klienfeltersville Hunters and anglers have always been at the forefront of the conservation movement. National Hunting and Fishing Day is designed to acknowledge and celebrate the contributions of sportsmen towards conservation. It also is designed to introduce others to the joys of outdoor pursuits. Many sportsmen’s organizations will be represented along with other conservation groups. There will be ongoing exhibits, programs and activities throughout the day. If you appreciate and enjoy the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area, come out and thank the sportsmen; for without them, places like Middle Creek would not exist. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For further information or directions, please call the Middle Creek Visitor Center at: 717-733-1512.
October 3 Visit with the Game Commission, Elk County Visit with the Game Commission on the elk range at Winslow Hill. 3:30 PM until dark. Enhance your visit with a list of elk viewing destinations and information about Pennsylvania elk. The Winslow Hill Viewing Area is located on top of Winslow Hill 1.2 miles north of route 555 on the left side of Winslow Hill Road from Benezette. More information is available through the Northcentral Region Office, 570-398-4744.
October 4 Visit with the Game Commission, Elk County Visit with the Game Commission on the elk range at Winslow Hill. 3:30 PM until dark. Enhance your visit with a list of elk viewing destinations and information about Pennsylvania elk. The Winslow Hill Viewing Area is located on top of Winslow Hill 1.2 miles north of route 555 on the left side of Winslow Hill Road from Benezette. More information is available through the Northcentral Region Office, 570-398-4744.
October 4 Campfire and Pennsylvania Owls Program, Elk County Visit with the Game Commission on the elk range at Dents Run for a campfire (starts at 7:30 PM) and to learn about Pennsylvania Owls(8-8:30 PM). Bring your own chair. Enhance your visit with a list of elk viewing destinations and information about Pennsylvania elk.  The Dents Run Viewing Area is located along Winslow Hill Road, roughly two miles north of route 555 from Benezette. Continue past the Winslow Hill viewing area about eight-tenths of a mile on the black-topped Winslow Hill Road. More information is available through the Northcentral Region Office, 570-398-4744.
October 5 Wildlife Sign, Elk County Visit with the Game Commission on the elk range at Dents Run for a program on Wildlife Sign at 11:00 AM. Enhance your visit with a list of elk viewing destinations and information about Pennsylvania elk. The Dents Run Viewing Area is located along Winslow Hill Road, roughly two miles north of route 555 from Benezette. Continue past the Winslow Hill viewing area about eight-tenths of a mile on the black-topped Winslow Hill Road. More information is available through the Northcentral Region Office, 570-398-4744.
October 10 Visit with the Game Commission, Elk County Visit with the Game Commission on the elk range at Winslow Hill. 3:30 PM until dark. Enhance your visit with a list of elk viewing destinations and information about Pennsylvania elk. The Winslow Hill Viewing Area is located on top of Winslow Hill 1.2 miles north of route 555 on the left side of Winslow Hill Road from Benezette. More information is available through the Northcentral Region Office, 570-398-4744.
October 11 Visit with the Game Commission, Elk County Visit with the Game Commission on the elk range at Winslow Hill. 3:30 PM until dark. Enhance your visit with a list of elk viewing destinations and information about Pennsylvania elk. The Winslow Hill Viewing Area is located on top of Winslow Hill 1.2 miles north of route 555 on the left side of Winslow Hill Road from Benezette. More information is available through the Northcentral Region Office, 570-398-4744.
October 11 Campfire and Pennsylvania Bats Program, Elk County Visit with the Game Commission on the elk range at Dents Run for a campfire (starts at 7:30 PM) and to learn about Pennsylvania Bats (8-8:30 PM). Bring your own chair. Enhance your visit with a list of elk viewing destinations and information about Pennsylvania elk. The Dents Run Viewing Area is located along Winslow Hill Road, roughly two miles north of route 555 from Benezette. Continue past the Winslow Hill viewing area about eight-tenths of a mile on the black-topped Winslow Hill Road. More information is available through the Northcentral Region Office, 570-398-4744.

Also scheduled are tours for state game lands and game farms.


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State Game Lands Tours

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Those looking to gain perspective into Pennsylvania’s wildlife, habitat and hunting heritage will have several opportunities in the coming weeks to take one or more tours being offered by the Pennsylvania Game Commission. Sunday driving tours of several tracts of state game lands across the Commonwealth are planned for Oct. 5, Oct. 12 and Oct. 19. The tours of state game lands provide an opportunity to talk to the personnel directly responsible for managing and protecting game lands, and four-wheel-drive vehicles are recommended for those taking driving tours on some tracts.

Game Commission Executive Director R. Matthew Hough said the tours provide an opportunity to show the public the many things being accomplished for wildlife and for Pennsylvania’s hunters. With autumn nearly here the tours should provide a splash of color and some of the best scenery the Commonwealth has to offer. The state game lands system has a long history in Pennsylvania. The Game Commission in 1919 was granted authority to purchase lands for the protection, propagation and management of wildlife, and provide areas for public hunting and trapping. With few exceptions, state game lands were purchased using revenues from hunting and furtaker license sales. Today, tracts of state game lands exist in all but Philadelphia and Delaware counties. Collectively, game lands make up a land base greater in size than the state of Delaware. Information on the tours is as follows:

GAME LANDS TOURS

  • Bedford and Blair counties: Sunday, Oct. 12, from noon to 3 p.m., State Game Lands 26, which encompasses 12,062 acres in a four-county area. This popular tour highlights mountainous terrain and fall foliage. The 7-mile, self-guided auto tour begins at the parking area on the northeast side of Route 869, between Pavia and Beaverdale, and concludes near the village of Blue Knob. Tour participants can scan the scenery for mounted wildlife specimens strategically placed along the route, as well as identification tags placed on examples of tree and shrubs beneficial to wildlife. Game Commission personnel will be on hand to answer questions relating to Game Commission programs and activities.

 

  • Berks and Schuykill counties: Sunday, Oct. 19, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. A vehicle tour of State Game Lands 110, which encompasses nearly 10,150 acres of historical, scenic and recreational property. The nine-mile trip will begin at the agency’s parking lot on Mountain Road, midway between the Shartlesville exit of Interstate 78 and Route 61. The tour will exit onto Route 183, north of Strausstown. Game Commission officers will be on hand to answer questions relating to Game Commission programs and activities. Also please note that due to the previously announced construction project on Ellendale Forge Road, the State Game Lands 211 tour will not be held this year. State Game Lands 211 is in Dauphin and Lebanon counties.

 

  • Bradford County: Sunday, Oct. 5, State Game Lands 12, from 10:30 a.m. until 3 p.m. (rain or shine). This is a 28-mile, self-guided, circular driving tour through State Game Lands 12, and will take about two hours to complete. State Game Lands 12 consists of nearly 24,480 acres in Bradford County. The route will start at the game lands parking lot on top of Wheelerville Mountain on state Route 154, just south of Canton, Bradford County. Roads are passable for most vehicles, four-wheel drive is not needed but a good ground clearance is advised. The route travels east to the Barclay Cemetery, then down the hill to Laquin before turning west onto the railroad grade to Wheelerville. The tour ends at the intersection with state Route 154 in Wheelerville. From there, those on the tour can travel north on state Route 154 to Canton, or south to Shunk in Sullivan County. The tour goes by Sunfish Pond County Park so a picnic lunch may be the order of the day! Those taking the tour are sure to find the local history of the mountain and the Game Commission’s refuge system is intriguing. A pocket guide full of historical information and photographs will be provided to each vehicle at the start of the tour.

 

  • Cambria County: Sunday, Oct. 19, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., State Game Lands 108, consisting of 23,086 acres. This 7.5-mile, self-guided, one-way, driving tour will highlight mountainous terrain and fall foliage on the Allegheny front. Items of interest along the tour route include a rehabilitated strip-mined area, which has been converted to small-game habitat. The area also serves as a study area for grassland nesting birds, including the Henslow’s sparrow, a grassland species of special concern. Northern harriers and endangered short-eared owls also inhabit the study area. Also highlighted are tree and shrub identification, wildlife habitat food plots and a deer exclosure fence. Each tour participant will be provided a brochure with directions and information about features along the tour route. The tour begins at the game lands access road three-tenths of a mile north of Frugality, along state Route 53, in White Township. Watch for the sign. The tour will conclude on state Route 865, near Blandburg in Reade Township. Game Commission land management, forestry, wildlife management, and law enforcementpersonnel will be on hand to explain the various habitat improvement projects on this state game lands, and to answer questions.

 

  • Carbon County: Sunday, Oct. 5, State Game Lands 141, which consists of nearly 17,048 acres. Registration will be held from 8 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at the large parking lot along state Route 93 on State Game Lands 141, Nesquehoning Township. Game Commission personnel will be on hand to explain various points of interest, including wildlife habitat-improvement projects. Four-wheel-drive vehicles with high clearance are recommended for this 9-mile, self-guided driving tour.  The tour will begin at the large parking area on the east side state Route 93 and travels east on a game lands road toward the Lehigh Gorge State Park, and back to state Route 93, exiting at the parking lot across from the game lands shooting range. The tour will pass habitat-improvement projects completed by the game lands Food and Cover Corps crew located in Carbon County, along with the National Wild Turkey Federation, The Nature Conservancy, and the Ruffed Grouse Society. Representatives from the Game Commission and conservation organizations will be on hand to explain the projects and answer questions. Directions: Take state Route 93 north from state Route 209 and proceed 3.5 miles and turn right into the parking lot. Proceed through the gate on a dirt road. Each vehicle will be provided a map and brief explanation of wildlife and habitat management programs being carried out on this magnificent tract of public hunting land.

 

  • Elk County: Sunday, Oct. 12, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., State Game Lands 311. Start at the state game lands gate at the end of Dewey Road on Winslow Hill. For more information, contact the Game Commission Northcentral Region Office at 570-398-4744.

 

  • Luzerne and Wyoming counties: Sunday, Oct. 5, State Game Lands 57, which consists of nearly 44,600 acres. Registration to be held from 7:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at the headquarters building complex on State Game Lands 57, Ricketts Station, Forkston Township, Wyoming County. Game Commission personnel will be on hand to explain various points of interest, including wildlife habitat-improvement projects. Four-wheel-drive vehicles with high clearance are required for this 30-mile, self-guided driving tour. The tour will pass habitat-improvement projects completed by the State Game Lands 57 Food and Cover Corps crew, along with the National Wild Turkey Federation, the Quality Deer Management Association and Ducks Unlimited. Representatives from the Game Commission and conservation organizations will be on hand to explain the projects and answer questions. Directions: Take state Route 487 north from state Route 118 and proceed 7.5 miles. Turn right onto the dirt road near the game lands sign on the right. Travel 0.1 miles to “Y” intersection and proceed 0.3 miles to the headquarters complex. Each vehicle will be provided a map and brief explanation of wildlife and habitat-management programs being carried out on this magnificent tract of public hunting land.

In addition, on September 28, the Game Commission will host tours on each of its four game farms.


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Waterfowl and Migratory Bird Season Information

Are you searching for waterfowl and migratory bird season information? See the summary below.

Ducks Seasons and Bag Limits

North Zone: Ducks, sea ducks, coots and mergansers, Oct. 11-Nov. 29, and Dec. 23-Jan. 10.
South Zone: Ducks, sea ducks, coots and mergansers, Oct. 18-25, and Nov. 15-Jan. 15.
Northwest Zone: Ducks, sea ducks, coots and mergansers, Oct. 11-Dec. 13, and Dec. 27-Jan. 1.
Lake Erie Zone: Ducks, sea ducks, coots and mergansers, Oct. 27-Jan. 3.
Total Duck Bag Limits: 6 daily, 18 in possession of any species, except for the following restrictions: daily limit may not include more than 4 mallards including 2 hen mallards, 2 scaup, 1 black duck, 3 wood ducks, 2 redheads, 1 canvasback, 2 pintails, 1 mottled duck, 1 fulvous whistling duck and 4 scoters. Possession limits are triple the daily limits.
Mergansers: 5 daily, 15 in possession (not more than 2 hooded mergansers daily, 6 hooded in possession).
Coots: 15 daily, 45 in possession.
Duck Zone Boundaries:
Lake Erie Zone – Lake Erie, Presque Isle and the area within 150 yards of the Lake Erie shoreline.
Northwest Zone -
The area bounded on the north by the Lake Erie Zone and including all of Erie and Crawford counties and all of Mercer and Venango counties north of I-80.
North Zone - The area east of the Northwest Zone and north of I-80 to Route 220, north from I-80 to I-180, north and east of I-180 from Route 220 to I-80, north of I-80 from I-180 to the Delaware River.
South Zone - All of state not in the Lake Erie, Northwest and North Zones.

Canada Goose Seasons and Bag Limits
This includes white-fronted geese. All of Pennsylvania will have a regular Canada goose season, however, season lengths and bag limits will vary by zone as follows:

RESIDENT POPULATION GOOSE ZONE (RP)
All of Pennsylvania except for the Southern James Bay Population and the Atlantic Population zones. The season is Oct. 25-Nov. 29, Dec. 18-Jan. 15, and Feb. 2-28, with a 5-goose daily bag limit; 15-goose possession limit.
SOUTHERN JAMES BAY POPULATION ZONE (SJBP)
The area north of I-80 and west of I-79 including in the city of Erie west of Bay Front Parkway to and including the Lake Erie Duck zone (Lake Erie, Presque Isle and the area within 150 yards of Lake Erie Shoreline). The season is Oct. 11-Nov. 29 and Dec. 15-Jan. 23, with a 3-goose daily limit; 9-goose possession limit.
ATLANTIC POPULATION ZONE (AP)
The area east of SR 97 from Maryland State Line to the intersection of SR 194, east of SR 194 to intersection of US Route 30, south of US Route 30 to SR 441, east of SR 441 to SR 743, east of SR 743 to intersection of I-81, east of I-81 to intersection of I-80, south of I-80 to New Jersey state line. The season is Nov. 15-29 and Dec. 15-Jan. 26, with a 3-goose daily limit; 9-goose possession limit. Exception: The controlled hunting areas at the Middle Creek WMA and all of SGL 46 in Lebanon-Lancaster counties has a daily bag limit of one, and possession limit of three during the regular Canada goose season.

September Canada Goose: Sept. 1-25; 3 daily, 9 in possession (SJBP zone); 8 daily, 24 in possession (rest of state); exceptions:

1.) In the area south of SR 198 from the Ohio state line to intersection of SR 18, SR 18 south to SR 618, SR 618 south to US Route 6, US Route 6 east to US Route 322/SR 18, US Route 322/SR 18 west to intersection of SR 3013, SR 3013 south to the Crawford/Mercer County line. The daily bag limit is 1, possession limit 3; except on SGL 214 where the season is closed to September goose hunting.
2.) Canada geese may be taken on Pymatuning State Park Reservoir and an area to extend 100 yards inland from the shoreline of the reservoir, excluding the area east of SR 3011 (Hartstown Road). The daily bag limit is 3, possession limit of 9.
3.) In the area of Lancaster and Lebanon counties north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike I-76, east of SR 501 to SR 419, south of SR 419 to Lebanon-Berks county line, west of Lebanon-Berks county line and the Lancaster-Berks county line to SR 1053 (also known as Peartown Road and Greenville Road), west of SR 1053 to Pennsylvania Turnpike I-76, the daily bag limit is 1, possession limit 3; except on SGL 46 (Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area) where the season is closed.
Note: Exceptions 1 and 3 do not apply to youth participation on youth waterfowl days, when regular season regulations apply. Hunting hours for all migratory birds, including Canada geese, close at sunset on youth waterfowl days.

Youth Waterfowl Days: Statewide: Sept. 20; also in North and Northwest zones, Sept. 27; in Lake Erie Zone, Oct. 18; and in South Zone, Nov. 8. Refer to PGC website for more details.

Brant (All Zones): Oct. 18-Nov. 21, 2 daily, 6 in possession.

Light Geese (Snow Geese and Ross’ Geese) Seasons and Bag Limits
Atlantic Population Zone:
Regular: Oct. 1-Jan. 26, 25 daily, no possession limit. Conservation Hunt: Jan. 27 – April 24; 25 daily, no possession limit.
Southern James Bay Population Zone:
Regular: Oct. 1-Jan. 23; 25 daily, no possession limit. Conservation Hunt: Jan. 24 – April 24; 25 daily, no possession limit.
Resident Population Zone:
Regular: Oct. 28-Feb. 28; 25 daily, no possession limit. Conservation Hunt: March 2 – April 24; 25 daily, no possession limit.

Harlequin Ducks, and Tundra and Trumpeter Swans: No open season.

Webless Migratory Bird Seasons and Daily Bag Limits

Species Season Daily Limit
Doves * Sept. 1-Nov.15
Nov. 22-Nov. 29
Dec. 27-Jan. 1 15
Woodcock Oct. 18-Nov. 29 3
Common snipe Oct. 18-Nov. 29 8
Virginia and sora rails ** Sept. 1-Nov. 8 3
(The season for king and clapper rails is closed.)
Gallinules Sept. 1 -Nov. 8 3

* Dove season hunting hours are noon to sunset for Sept. 1-25 and 1/2 hour before sunrise to sunset for Sept. 26 – Nov. 15 as well as for the second and third segments.
** Bag limits singly or combined.
Possession limit is triple the daily bag limit.
Refer to PGC website for further details and regulations.

For information on falconry migratory game bird hunting seasons refer to the PGC website at http://www.pgc.state.pa.us.

Licenses Required, in addition to a Pennsylvania hunting license, to hunt ducks and geese:
Persons 16 and older – Federal Duck Stamp, signed in ink across its face, and Migratory Game Bird License (HIP).
Persons 12 through 15 – Migratory Game Bird License (HIP).
A valid Migratory Game Bird License (HIP) is also required to hunt other migratory game birds, including doves, woodcock, coots, gallinules, rails and snipe. If you purchased a HIP license last year, be sure to provide your last year’s migratory game bird harvest results when asked. By answering these questions you will be entered into a pool of hunters from which samples for federal harvest surveys are drawn. Your responses to the questions improve efficiency and the quality of the information used to monitor the harvest of migratory birds for management purposes.

Voluntary PA Duck Stamp – Helps finance wetland acquisition and development and waterfowl education.

Band Reporting: online at www.reportband.gov, or call TOLL-FREE, 1-800-327-2263.

More details can be found here. Always consult the Hunting & Trapping Digest as well.

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